Tuesdays With Morrie



Description


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Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher or a colleague. Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, and gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it. For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly 20 years ago. Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you? Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying of ALS - or amyothropic lateral sclerosis - Morrie visited Mitch in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final "class": lessons in how to live. This is a chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world.

Review


This true story about the love between a spiritual mentor and his pupil has soared to the bestseller list for many reasons. For starters: it reminds us of the affection and gratitude that many of us still feel for the significant mentors of our past. It also plays out a fantasy many of us have entertained: what would it be like to look those people up again, tell them how much they meant to us, maybe even resume the mentorship? Plus, we meet Morrie Schwartz--a one of a kind professor, whom the author describes as looking like a cross between a biblical prophet and Christmas elf. And finally we are privy to intimate moments of Morrie's final days as he lies dying from a terminal illness. Even on his deathbed, this twinkling-eyed mensch manages to teach us all about living robustly and fully. Kudos to author and acclaimed sports columnist Mitch Albom for telling this universally touching story with such grace and humility. --Gail Hudson

Quick Steps to Follow During the Summer


1. Read the book and fill out a plot sheet.
2. Post two, one-paragraph responses to any of the questions listed on the "Discussion" page.
3. Pick one of the "Prove-It" Projects listed below. Complete the project and a plot sheet before school starts in August.


Prove It Projects -- Summer Reading Assignments


Each student is required to read one novel over the summer. Students will choose a "Prove-It" project from the list of options provided by your teacher on the novel page. The following document contains a complete list of Prove It projects as well as project descriptions/directions. In addition, each student should post at least two, paragraph length responses to questions posted on the novel discussion page. Questions about projects may also be posted on the novel page discussion section. Good luck!

Options for Prove It Projects


(1) Film a documentary. Act as if you are Mitch Albom reporting on Morrie. Create a documentary that is thorough and exhibits all of Morrie's characteristics. Refer to specific examples from the book to show these characteristics. Have your movie saved on a DVD and ready to play on any DVD player. This project could be completed individually or in a group of up to three students. I will need to see evidence that ALL group members worked on the video. Each member must complete their own plot sheet.

(2) Create a character monologue. Pretend you are one of the characters and present a monologue in written form that reveals your personality, special talents, or feelings. This could be done as a series of smaller journal entries or one large entry. You should have at least a page and a half of writing but no more than three pages.

(3) Create a board game. Put together a fun game centered around the novel. Be sure to Include descriptive questions about the book. Feel free to ask anything about the plot: characters, setting, conflicts, etc. You should include questions that go a little more in depth and require inferential skills. Think of the things you write on summary reactions. Be sure to create some questions that are easy and some that are challenging. Your game needs all the required pieces and SHOULD BE PLAYABLE when you bring it.

(4) Re-create a scene from the book. Pick an important scene from the book and film it. Make sure it is a scene that really shows the characteristics of the characters. A lengthy narration explaining why you picked the scene and its importance must be included. Have your movie saved on a DVD and ready to play on any DVD player. This project could be completed individually or in a group of up to three students. I will need to see evidence that ALL group members worked on the video. Each member must complete their own plot sheet.

Important
Do not make your projects overly goofy; they should be respectful to the real-life characters. Have fun creating the projects, but keep them serious.